Cissus Powder 1kg

Cissus quadrangularis has been used as a medicinal plant since antiquity.[citation needed] Cissus has been used in various Ayurvedic classical medicines to heal broken bones and injured ligaments and tendons.[citation needed] In siddha medicine it is considered a tonic and analgesic, and is believed to help heal broken bones, thus its name asthisamharaka (that which prevents the destruction of bones). The Assamese people and the Garo tribe of Meghalaya and Bangladesh have used C. quadrangularis for bone fracture.[4]

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Resource https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cissus_quadrangularis

Cissus quadrangularis has been used as a medicinal plant since antiquity.[citation needed] Cissus has been used in various Ayurvedic classical medicines to heal broken bones and injured ligaments and tendons.[citation needed] In siddha medicine it is considered a tonic and analgesic, and is believed to help heal broken bones, thus its name asthisamharaka (that which prevents the destruction of bones). The Assamese people and the Garo tribe of Meghalaya and Bangladesh have used C. quadrangularis for bone fracture.[4]

One preliminary clinical study found a benefit in weight reduction and an improvement in the symptoms associated with metabolic syndrome in obese patients who had been given C. quadrangularis supplements.[5] Another study found a potential synergistic effect between C. quadrangularis and Irvingia gabonensis.[6] A weight loss supplement containing Cissus quadrangularis and other ingredients including green tea, soy, selenium, chromium, and B vitamins was evaluated in an 8-week trial. The supplement helped reduce body weight by 4–8% (placebo 2.4%) a clinically significant weight loss.[7]

A paper published in the World Journal of Gastroenterology in October 2010, on conflicts of interest in alternative weight loss product research, noted that at least three studies supported the safety and effectiveness of CQ for weight loss, but "lack financial disclosures or funding sources, beyond mentioning that the CQ being tested was provided by" General Health Alliances, an herbal products manufacturer. The studies did not disclose that one of its authors was a chief scientific officer for GHA that holds a patent on a CQ product.[8]

C. quadrangularis has been studied for its effects in a rat model for osteoporosis.[9]

C. quadrangularis has been studied in animal models of bone fracture.[10]

Its bactericidal effects on Helicobacter pylori indicate a potential use for treating gastric ulcers in conjunction with NSAID therapy.[11]

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